OUTSIDE, IN-BETWEEN

Student Name: Tianyuan Fan, Sana Jahani

School: University of California, Los Angeles

Studio: Climate Caravan: Mobility is Resilience

Instructor: Heather Roberge

Recognizing inevitable climate migration as a catalyst for new housing demands, this project re-evaluates the limitations of prefabricated building systems in order to produce shelter aggregates with mobility in mind. Our project explores the development of an aggregate system that can exercise equivalent degrees of control over figure and ground and use the same parts to produce different field effects that are highly particular despite their reliance on seriality. By using architecture to enact a spatial version of a social contract, we are not only designing individual houses, but their relationship to other units as well.  It is in the spaces between units that we are designing for collective life and elevating the community gathered by this housing to the same social importance as the family unit. 

HOUSING AGGREGATE TEST BEDS AT 3 SCALES: MICRO AND MULTIPLE, VILLAGE, AND URBAN
Primary 2
THE BISTABILITY OF AGGREGATIONS

In his recent book Down to Earth, Bruno Latour makes evident that climate change has already shifted political landscapes across the globe leading to migration, civil war and unrest, and migrant detention. Given this incredibly dynamic planetary and international backdrop, this project disputes the presupposed notion of permanence that accompanies housing production. We propose a prefabricated housing system designed for future mobility and new organizations of community afforded by unit aggregation. Our prefab proposal is considered against a migration scenario that shapes the selection of site test beds for development. Migration scenarios articulate critical stances regarding how and where we might live, the relationships between units, the adaptability and aesthetics of this future housing, and its relationship to existing infrastructure.

Primary 3
HOUSING AGGREGATIONS

Outside, In-Between explores the development of an aggregate system that can exercise equivalent degrees of control over figure and ground and use the same parts to produce different field effects that are highly particular despite their reliance on seriality. For us, it is simply not enough to design individual units. By using architecture to enact a spatial version of a social contract, we are designing individual houses and their relationships to other houses. It is in the space between units that we are designing for collective life and elevating the community gathered by this housing to the same social importance as the family unit.

1
FLOOR PLAN
6
SECTION

The housing units are designed with panel modularity, using a regulating geometry of isosceles triangles and bisected squares. Based on this geometry we’ve developed 6 building components. Using the same standardized panels across the project, we designed numerous housing plans, while eliminating a hierarchy and orientation that is pre-established between house and parcel boundary. That contingency eliminates ownership over exterior space, which disrupts typical understandings of communal relations.  

Configurations-GIF
CONFIGURATION
LANDSCAPE CONFIGURATION
Micro-GIF
MICRO 1
MICRO 2

The ambitions of our prefab system have to do with understanding that space in between units can be as spatial and programmatic as an interior of a house, resulting in outdoor rooms of different sizes and configurations. The implicit social contract produced by the spatial qualities of our project requires that members of society cooperate for social benefits. Residents don’t have dominion over their own private plot of land. Instead, they share different scales of exterior spaces that ultimately promote collective life and elevate the community.

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5
RENDERING